ORG Birmingham Mozilla Maker Party helps fix copyright one meme at a time

On Tuesday evening we met at Centrala arts space in Digbeth to hold our first ever  held our first ever Mozilla Maker Party. The purpose of the evening was to make  people aware of EU plans to change copyright in ways that threaten creativity and freedom of expression on the internet. `Attendees worked with Birmingham-based digital artist  Antonio Roberts to create satirical memes and rebellious selfies to highlight the flaws in the EU’s plans and make the case for a copyright system which  is able to keep up with how we lives our lives now.

Continue reading ORG Birmingham Mozilla Maker Party helps fix copyright one meme at a time

Let’s get together to watch ‘The Haystack’ documentary on 21st century survillance

Still taken from The Haystack documentary on surveillance in the UK. The image shows people walking along a crowded street in central London and a news headline which says 'Britain is too tolerant and should interfere more in people's lives, says David Cameron'

We’re excited to announce we’ll be screening ‘The Haystack’ documentary, which examines the rise of suspicionless surveillance in the UK, at our next meetup on Monday 4 July.

Continue reading Let’s get together to watch ‘The Haystack’ documentary on 21st century survillance

Art against the Snooper’s Charter workshop a success

Thank you to everyone who was able to join us last Wednesday at Birmingham Open Media for our creative workshop to raise.

We had a fun evening making memes and other visual materials designed to raise public awareness of the government’s plans to push ahead with its controversial new surveillance bill, officially known as the Investigatory Powers Bill but better understood as a Snooper’s Charter.

The idea behind the evening was

You can read a write-up of the event and see the artwork we created over on Birmingham Open Media’s website.

Art against the Snooper’s Charter 

We hoped creating memes and other visuals would help more people understand what’s at the stake if the Snooper’s Charter becomes law. Speaking in parliament the day before our meetup, My local MP Steve McCabe (@steve_mccabe) summed things up quite nicely, saying that if the bill is passed in its current form “we will be the envy of states such as North Korea, China and Iran“.

Envy of North Korea

I’m pleased to report we have had a good reaction so far to our artwork on Twitter, with people re-tweeting and liking our creations and sharing their own.

Give memes a chance

If you’d like to have a go at creating your own protest meme, check out ImgFlip’s easy-to-use Meme Generator web tool.

Want to create something a little more complex? Why not try using the free and open source GIMP image editor to mock up a thought-provoking image like this playful riff on 1984?

Spread the word

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If you like any of the visuals we’ve created or decide to create your own, please think about sharing them with your friends and family. Visuals hit home to people in a way that complex arguments and wordy blogs can’t possibly hope to.

If you’re sharing on social media , remember to mention the Investigatory Powers Bill/Snooper’s Charter in your posts and, if possible include the hashtags #IPBill and #SnoopersCharter. If you’re using Twitter, copying in @OpenRightsBrum will also allow us to more easily re-tweet your posts.

Don’t forget to email your MP (and sign the 38 Degrees petition)

While it’s really important we broaden the reach of our campaign through memes, we still need to keep up the pressure on MPs through traditional campaigning methods.

If you’ve not already done so, please use Open Rights Group’s easy-to-use web tool to email your MP today. The more MPs hear concerns from their consituents over the coming months, the better chance we have of stopping the Snooper’s Charter.

Once you’ve done this, please also take a couple of minutes to sign and share the new 38 Degrees petition, Stop Government Plans to Snoop on Your Internet History.

Can you spare a few quid to fight the Snooper’s Charter?

Lastly, the Don’t Spy On Us coalition (which Open Rights Group is a member) is currently a crowdfunding a hard-hitting advertising campaign to raise awareness of the Snooper’s Charter. Please spare what you can to help stop the bill.

Don’t Spy On Us launches fundraiser for Investigatory Powers Bill ad campaign

Investigatory Powers Bill now published : Email your MP!

Cover of Draft Investigatory Powers Bill report

You’ve probably heard by now that earlier today (1 March) the Home Office has published the revised Snoopers’ Charter / Investigatory Powers Bill less than three weeks after three reports by MPs and peers made 123 recommendations for changes.

On first reading, the revised Bill barely pays lip service to the serious concerns raised by the committees that scrutinised the draft Bill. The Bill still includes police powers to see which websites and apps we use, and bulk surveillance powers for GCHQ – it needs serious improvements.

You can find out more on the Don’t Spy On Us coalition website.

Ask your MP to stand up to the Home Office

Now that the Home Office has published the Bill, we need MPs to stand up to the Home Office’s attempts to ride roughshod over parliamentary scrutiny and avoid having a proper public debate.

You can help by contacting your MP to tell them you are unhappy about what the Home Office is doing and asking them to make sure the Investigatory Powers Bill is not rushed.

The national Open Rights Group has created an easy-to-use form for emailing your MP:

Email your MP tool

Remember, you don’t have to write a lot, the most important thing is to contact your MP as soon as possible to remind them that the Home Office should not rush the Investigatory Powers Bill should not be rushed through parliament. The main messages to include are:

  • The Investigatory Powers Bill should not be rushed. The Home Office has been told to examine carefully the criticisms and recommendations of three Parliamentary committees. Less than three weeks is not enough time for a considered redrafting of the Bill. The new Bill only has a few significant changes from the draft version.
  • The new powers for the Police to access our ‘Internet Connection Records’ – a database of our online activity in the last 12 months – is invasive and unneccessary. Internet Service Providers, web hosting companies, and parliamentarians have been critical of this power.
  • The arguments made for bulk collection powers and Internet Connection Records are built on anecdotes. The operational case needs to provide figures, costs, and be open to scrutiny.

We’d love to hear what kind of repsponse you get from your MP. You can let us know via Twitter @OpenRightsGroup and @OpenRightsBrum

Keep up to date with ORG Birmingham

Please sign up for our mailing list to be first to know about future workshops, talks and campaigns:

Open Rights Group mailing list

You can also follow latest developments on Twitter @OpenRightsGroup@OpenRightsBrum and the #IPBill hashtag.

Stop the government rushing through the Investigatory Powers Bill. Email your MP today!

Cover of Draft Investigatory Powers Bill report

The Open Rights Group needs your help! Please read on for how you can help stop the government passing the seriously flawed Investigatory Powers Bill.

Today (1 March), the government plans to introduce to the House of Commons a revised version of the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill.

This is less than three weeks (!) since the Joint Committee set up to review the bill published a report calling on the government to make significant changes to the bill, including:

– Strengthening privacy safeguards
– Clarifying the government’s position on encryption, which is essential to modern life and the digital economy
– Making the case for mass surveillance/bulk collection of everyone’s data in a way that is legally compliant with the UK’s obligations to protect the right to privacy

You can read more about the committee’s recommendations over on the Open Rights Group website.

These are complex issues and the stakes are incredibly high – our civil liberties and national security are at stake. It is difficult to believe the government has given itself enough time to take on board the feedback it has received. Instead, the government is giving the impression that it is determined to pass the Investigatory Powers Bill at any cost, in order to free up more time to focus on higher profile issues, such as this summer’s referendum on EU membership.

Take action – email your MP today!

If we are stop the government rushing through the Investigatory Powers Bill, we need to gain the support of MPs.

You can help by emailing your local MP to let them know you are concerned about the government’s plans to rush through the Investigatory Powers Bill.

You can easily find out who your local MP is and email them directly via the excellent WriteToThem website.

Please don’t let the technical aspects of the surveillance debate put you off contacting your local MP. Simply letting your MP know you are concerned about the government’s approach and asking them to consider the issues will make a real difference.

Wherever possible, please include in your email a link to the guidance the Don’t Spy on us coalition has produced for parliamentarians. This explains in more detail the problems with the Investigatory Powers Bill and what MPs can do to make the bill fit-for-purpose.

https://www.dontspyonus.org.uk/blog/2016/02/26/investigatory-powers-bill-how-to-make-it-fit-for-purpose/

When writing to your MP, remember to be polite and encouraging, not rude and demanding. Respectfully making your local MP aware of the issues surrounding the bill is the best way to build support for an Investigatory Powers Bill that is truly fit-for-purpose.

Open Rights Group Birmingham Established to Promote Digital Rights in Birmingham and Beyond

Male and female digital rights supporters sit around a table discussing digital rights at the launch event of Open Rights Group Birmingham, held at Birmingham Open Media

Thank you to everyone who joined us at Birmingham Open Media on Wednesday for the Open Rights Group Birmingham launch event.

Bringing people together (thanks to the power of crisps)

Over a fine(ish) selection of crisps and drinks, group organiser Francis Clarke explained why he had been motivated to establish Open Rights Group Birmingham to bring together people who are passionate about human rights and digital technology and want want to make a practical difference in the world.

The launch brought together people from different backgrounds and interests. Thanks to Birmingham Open Media’s support, artists were well-represented, as were people from Birmingham’s technology and community sectors. It was also great to see a positive gender balance, with an equal number of men and women contributing to the discussion.

After informal discussions about why it is important for all of us that  people’s rights are valued online as well as offline, the discussion shifted to what practical action members of Open Rights Group Birmingham can take to raise public awareness of threats to digital rights – from mass surveillance to restrictive business practices – and to encourage people to make full use of the potential of open technology.

Regular meetups and creative campaigning

Sandwich board outside Birmingham Open Media advertising the Open Right Group Birmingham launch
I assure you we are open: a sandwich board outside Birmingham Open Media advertising the Open Right Group Birmingham launch

Moving forward, we will be holding regular FREE meet-ups in Birmingham for people to learn more about digital rights and open technology. We will be aiming to bring in guest speakers and screen interesting documentaries.

We have also started to think about what else we can do to convey the importance of digital rights to a more general audience. It’s still early days but we’re hoping to hold a series of events in October, to coincide with Democracy Week.

Open Rights Group Birmingham founder, Francis Clarke, said:

“As digital technology becomes central to our everyday lives, people are increasingly recognising the importance of ensuring human rights are valued the same online as offline. Open Rights Group Birmingham will work hard to protect digital rights in Birmingham and beyond and to promote an open, transparent society.”

Open Rights Group Birmingham is part of the UK-based campaigning organisation, Open Rights Group (ORG). Made up over 3,000 members, ORG works on issues ranging from mass surveillance, to copyright, censorship, data protection and open data and privacy.

Just 3 Sleeps to go until the Open Rights Group Birmingham Launch on Wednesday!

Open Rights Group leaflets and stickers piled up on a table

With there being just 3 more sleeps to go until Open Rights Group Birmingham (ORG Birmingham) launches on Wednesday (if you haven’t signed up yet, you can do so from here), I wanted to share with you some interesting updates.

Here comes the merch

Open Rights Group leaflets and stickers piled up on a table
Open Rights Group leaflets and stickers piled up on a table

Firstly, and perhaps most importantly, the central team at ORG have kindly sent me what can only be described as a motherlode of merch. Should you be able to make our meetup on Wednesday you will be able to get your hands on some rather nifty looking ORG stickers and leaflets to help you spread our message on digital rights far and wide.  I hope you’re excited about the merch as I am.

Draft Agenda

Secondly, I had a good chat during the week with Lydia Snodin, ORG’s local groups coordinator. Lydia’s given me some tips  and generally boosted my confidence about hosting our first ever meet-up.

While our first meet-up is most definitely intended to be friendly, relaxed and informal, Lydia has recommended we work to a basic structure so that everyone gets a chance to contribute and we make the most of our time together.

Here’s my first attempt at an agenda. I’ve tried to structure our meetup so that the most important bits happen early on so that people who need to leave early can still contribute. As ever, your feedback is very much appreciated.

6-6.30: Arrival and registration/sign-up

6.30 – 6.45: Welcome people to ORG Birmingham. Explain reasons for organising meet-up. Thank people for getting involved.
6.45-7.00:’Lightning’ introductions. People have 1 minute to say who they are and why they came along to the meet-up.
7-7.30: What do people want from ORG Birmingham?

Encourage guest to suggest future meet-up topics, speakers and campaign activities.

Introduction to the Snoopers’ Charter and what it could mean for digital rights.

7.30-7.45: Agree date and topic of next meet-up.
7.45-8: Introduction to the Snoopers’ Charter
8-8.30. Group discussion about Snoopers’ Charter and possible ORG Birmingham responses to it.
8.30-9. More chat. Guests disperse.

Keep Yourselves Refreshed – BYOB policy

White and black cat sitting next to a cup of coffee
White and black cat sitting next to a cup of coffee

I am reliably informed our hosts for the evening, Birmingham Open Media (BOM), will be able to make us a cup of tea or coffee. Beyond that, they might struggle as we will be using the venue out of hours and access to facilities will be limited.

To keep things fun, I’ll be doing my best party host impression and will supply some snacks and soft drinks. If you’re thinking of coming it would be great if you could bring along some snacks and drinks. BOM are pretty relaxed about people bringing alcoholic drinks into the venue provided we are responsible. If you can stretch to bringing refreshments for you plus one more, we should have plenty of food and drink for everyone to enjoy.

Come Along to the 1st ever Open Rights Group Birmingham Meet-up

I am proud to announce Open Rights Group Birmingham will be holding its 1st ever meet-up in just over a week’s time, after work on Wednesday 8th July.

Full size image of poster advertising 1st ever meet-up of Open Rights Group Birmingham campaign group

Birmingham Open Media (BOM) have very kindly agreed to host our meet-up for free, which is fantastic. If you’re not familiar with their work, please do check them out.

The meet-up will be a relaxed, informal affair. It’s a chance for people with an interest in digital rights and open technology

to meet each other and figure out how we can work together to protect and promote digital rights in Birmingham and beyond.

By the end of the meet-up we should have a clearer idea of the issues we think Open Rights Group Birmingham should be focusing on and the next steps we will take to make progress on these issues.

Quite a few people have already expressed an interest in meeting up and forming an Open Rights Group Birmingham. It would be great if we could get as many people as possible along to the meet-up. I would be grateful if you could help spread the word by sharing this blog post and, if possible, printing and displaying a copy of the meet-up poster.

Admission is completely free but it would be helpful for planning purposes if you could let me know if you are thinking of coming. Francis Clarke. Email: clarke.francisg@gmail.com, Twitter: @francisclarke or Phone: 07749374339.

You can download a print quality version of the poster by clicking here.

ORG Birmingham local organiser, Francis Clarke